Child discipline

Corporal punishment prohibited in schools only Corporal punishment not prohibited Legality of corporal punishment in Europe Corporal punishment prohibited in schools and the home Corporal punishment prohibited in schools only Corporal punishment not prohibited in schools or in the home In many cultures, parents have historically had the right to spank their children when appropriate. The study noted that abusive physical punishment tended to be given by fathers and often involved striking the child's head or torso instead of the buttocks or limbs.

Child discipline

Topics in Disciplining Children

Whatever your child's age, it's important to be consistent when it comes to discipline. If parents don't stick to the rules and consequences they set up, their kids aren't likely to either. Here are some ideas about how to vary your approach to discipline to best fit your family.

Ages 0 to 2 Babies and toddlers are naturally curious. When your crawling baby or roving toddler heads toward an unacceptable or dangerous play object, calmly say "No" and either remove your child from the area or distract him or her with an appropriate activity.

Child discipline

Timeouts can be effective discipline for toddlers. A child who has been hitting, bitingor throwing food, for example, should be told why the behavior is unacceptable and taken to a designated timeout area — a kitchen chair or bottom stair — for a minute or two to calm down longer timeouts are not effective for toddlers.

It's important to not spank, hit, or slap a child of any age. Babies and toddlers are especially unlikely to be able to make any connection between their behavior and physical punishment. They will only feel the pain of the hit. And don't forget that kids learn by watching adults, particularly their parents.

Make sure your behavior is role-model material. Ages 3 to 5 As your child grows and begins to understand the connection between actions and consequences, make sure you start communicating the rules of your family's home. Explain to kids what you expect of them before you punish them for a behavior.

The first time your 3-year-old uses crayons to decorate the living room wall, discuss why that's not allowed and what will happen if your child does it again for instance, your child will have to help clean the wall and will not be able to use the crayons for the rest of the day.

If the wall gets decorated again a few days later, issue a reminder that crayons are for paper only and then enforce the consequences. The earlier that parents establish this kind of "I set the rules and you're expected to listen or accept the consequences" standard, the better for everyone.

Although it's sometimes easier for parents to ignore occasional bad behavior or not follow through on some threatened punishment, this sets a bad precedent.

Empty threats undermine your authority as a parent, and make it more likely that kids will test limits. While you become clear on what behaviors will be punished, don't forget to reward good behaviors.

For example, saying "I'm proud of you for sharing your toys at playgroup" is usually more effective than punishing a child who didn't share.

Child Discipline

And be specific when giving praise rather than just saying "Good job!Nationally recognized parenting expert Amy McCready is the Founder of Positive Parenting Solutions and the best selling author of The “Me, Me, Me” Epidemic - A Step-by-Step Guide to Raising Capable, Grateful Kids in an Over-Entitled World and If I Have to Tell You One More Time The Revolutionary Program That Gets Your Kids to Listen Without Nagging, Reminding or Yelling.

Parents have been desperate to control their children for generations, millennia, even eons if you want to get all arc of history about it. That impulse has historically yielded mixed results and strange traditions. The word discipline means to impart knowledge and skill – to teach.

However, it is often equated with punishment and control. There is a great deal of controversy about the appropriate ways to discipline children, and parents are often confused about effective ways to set limits and instill self-control in their child.

All children, including babies, need consistent discipline, so talk with your partner, family members, and child care provider to set basic rules everyone follows. Toddlers Your child is starting to recognize what's allowed and what isn't but may test some rules to see how you react.

Jul 14,  · When it comes to fixing bad behavior, moms are the real experts. Read on for smart strategies that will put a stop to whining, tantrums, back talk, and regardbouddhiste.com: Michelle Crouch. Continued Discipline Techniques. What you choose may depend on the type of inappropriate behavior your child displays, your child's age, your child's temperament, and your parenting style.

Disciplining Your Child